How to Make Your Very Own Home Theatre with a 4K TV

Setting up a home theater is a long-lost dream for many movie buffs. They reverie of watching all-time classics sitting with the people of their clan on a comfy couch in a personal environment. However, what keeps them away from taking a step towards setting it up, is the notion that the process is complicated. Believe me; it’s not. Particularly, if you already own one of those 4K Televisions that are ruling the consumer electronics market. So, if you are still spending some good cash on watching movies in the theater every weekend.

Introduction About TV:

Television is a telecommunication medium used for transmitting moving images in monochrome, or in colour, and in two or three dimensions and sound. The term can refer to a television set, a television program, or the medium of television transmission. Television is a mass medium for entertainment, education, news, politics, gossip and advertising.Television became available in crude experimental forms in the late 1920s, but it would still be several years before the new technology was marketed to consumers. After World War II, an improved form of black-and-white TV broadcasting became popular in the United States and Britain, and television sets became commonplace in homes, businesses, and institutions. During the 1950s, television was the primary medium for influencing public opinion.In the mid-1960s, color broadcasting was introduced in the US and most other developed countries.

The availability of multiple types of storage media such as Betamax, VHS tape, local disks, DVDs, flash drives, high definition Blu-ray Discs, and digital video recorders have enabled viewers to watch prerecorded material such as movies— at home on their own time schedule. For many reasons, the storage of television and video programming now occurs on the cloud. At the end of the first decade of the 2000s, digital television transmissions greatly increased in popularity. Another development was the move from standard-definition television to high-definition television, which provides a resolution that is substantially higher. HDTV may be transmitted in various formats: 1080p, 1080i and 720p. Since 2010, with the invention of smart television, Internet television has increased the availability of television programs and movies via the Internet through streaming video services such as Netflix, Amazon Video, iPlayer, Hulu, Roku and Chromecast.

In 2013, 79% of the world’s households owned a television set.The replacement of early bulky, high-voltage cathode ray tube screen displays with compact, energy-efficient, flat-panel alternative technologies such as plasma displays, LCDs (both fluorescent-backlit and LED), and OLED displays was a hardware revolution that began with computer monitors in the late 1990s. Most TV sets sold in the 2000s were flat-panel, mainly LEDs. Major manufacturers announced the discontinuation of CRT, DLP, plasma, and even fluorescent-backlit LCDs by the mid-2010s. In the near future, LEDs are expected to be gradually replaced by OLEDs.Also, major manufacturers have announced that they will increasingly produce smart TVs in the mid-2010s.Smart TVs with integrated Internet and Web 2.0 functions became the dominant form of television by the late 2010s.

Television signals were initially distributed only as terrestrial television using high-powered radio-frequency transmitters to broadcast the signal to individual television receivers. Alternatively television signals are distributed by coaxial cable or optical fiber, satellite systems and, since the 2000s via the Internet. Until the early 2000s, these were transmitted as analog signals, but a transition to digital television is expected to be completed worldwide by the late 2010s. A standard television set is composed of multiple internal electronic circuits, including a tuner for receiving and decoding broadcast signals. A visual display device which lacks a tuner is correctly called a video monitor rather than a television.

The word television comes from Ancient Greek, meaning ‘far’, and Latin visio, meaning ‘sight’. The first documented usage of the term dates back to 1900, when the Russian scientist Constantin Perskyi used it in a paper that he presented in French at the 1st International Congress of Electricity, which ran from 18 to 25 August 1900 during the International World Fair in Paris. The Anglicised version of the term is first attested in 1907, when it was still “…a theoretical system to transmit moving images over telegraph or telephone wires”.It was “…formed in English or borrowed from French télévision.”In the 19th century and early 20th century, other “…proposals for the name of a then-hypothetical technology for sending pictures over distance were telephote and televista.”The abbreviation “TV” is from 1948. The use of the term to mean “a television set” dates from 1941.The use of the term to mean “television as a medium” dates from 1927.The slang term “telly” is more common in the UK. The slang term “the tube” or the “boob tube” refers to the bulky cathode ray tube used on most TVs until the advent of flat-screen TVs. Another slang term for the TV is “idiot box”.

Facsimile transmission systems for still photographs pioneered methods of mechanical scanning of images in the early 19th century. Alexander Bain introduced the facsimile machine between 1843 and 1846. Frederick Bakewell demonstrated a working laboratory version in 1851. Willoughby Smith discovered the photoconductivity of the element selenium in 1873. As a 23 year old German university student, Paul Julius Gottlieb Nipkow proposed and patented the Nipkow disk in 1884.This was a spinning disk with a spiral pattern of holes in it, so each hole scanned a line of the image. Although he never built a working model of the system, variations of Nipkow’s spinning disk “image rasterizer” became exceedingly common.Constantin Perskyi had coined the word television in a paper read to the International Electricity Congress at the International World Fair in Paris on 25 August 1900. Perskyi’s paper reviewed the existing electromechanical technologies, mentioning the work of Nipkow and others.However, it was not until 1907 that developments in amplification tube technology by Lee de Forest and Arthur Korn, among others, made the design practical.

The first demonstration of the live transmission of images was by Georges Rignoux and A. Fournier in Paris in 1909. A matrix of 64 selenium cells, individually wired to a mechanical commutator, served as an electronic retina. In the receiver, a type of Kerr cell modulated the light and a series of variously angled mirrors attached to the edge of a rotating disc scanned the modulated beam onto the display screen. A separate circuit regulated synchronization. The 8×8 pixel resolution in this proof-of-concept demonstration was just sufficient to clearly transmit individual letters of the alphabet. An updated image was transmitted “several times” each second.In 1921 Edouard Belin sent the first image via radio waves with his belinograph.In 1911, Boris Rosing and his student Vladimir Zworykin created a system that used a mechanical mirror-drum scanner to transmit, in Zworykin’s words, “very crude images” over wires to the “Braun tube” (cathode ray tube or “CRT”) in the receiver. Moving images were not possible because, in the scanner: “the sensitivity was not enough and the selenium cell was very laggy”.

By the 1920s, when amplification made television practical, Scottish inventor John Logie Baird employed the Nipkow disk in his prototype video systems. On 25 March 1925, Baird gave the first public demonstration of televised silhouette images in motion, at Selfridge’s Department Store in London.Since human faces had inadequate contrast to show up on his primitive system, he televised a ventriloquist’s dummy named “Stooky Bill”, whose painted face had higher contrast, talking and moving. By 26 January 1926, he demonstrated the transmission of the image of a face in motion by radio. This is widely regarded as the first television demonstration. The subject was Baird’s business partner Oliver Hutchinson. Baird’s system used the Nipkow disk for both scanning the image and displaying it.

A bright light shining through a spinning Nipkow disk set with lenses projected a bright spot of light which swept across the subject. A Selenium photoelectric tube detected the light reflected from the subject and converted it into a proportional electrical signal. This was transmitted by AM radio waves to a receiver unit, where the video signal was applied to a neon light behind a second Nipkow disk rotating synchronized with the first. The brightness of the neon lamp was varied in proportion to the brightness of each spot on the image. As each hole in the disk passed by, one scan line of the image was reproduced. Baird’s disk had 30 holes, producing an image with only 30 scan lines, just enough to recognize a human face. In 1927, Baird transmitted a signal over 438 miles of telephone line between London and Glasgow.

In 1928, Baird’s company broadcast the first transatlantic television signal, between London and New York, and the first shore-to-ship transmission. In 1929, he became involved in the first experimental mechanical television service in Germany. In November of the same year, Baird and Bernard Natan of Pathé established France’s first television company, Télévision Baird Natan. In 1931, he made the first outdoor remote broadcast, of The Derby.In 1932, he demonstrated ultra-short wave television. Baird’s mechanical system reached a peak of 240 lines of resolution on BBC television broadcasts in 1936, though the mechanical system did not scan the televised scene directly. Instead a 17.5mm film was shot, rapidly developed and then scanned while the film was still wet.

An American inventor, Charles Francis Jenkins, also pioneered the television. He published an article on “Motion Pictures by Wireless” in 1913, but it was not until December 1923 that he transmitted moving silhouette images for witnesses; and it was on 13 June 1925, that he publicly demonstrated synchronized transmission of silhouette pictures. In 1925 Jenkins used the Nipkow disk and transmitted the silhouette image of a toy windmill in motion, over a distance of five miles, from a naval radio station in Maryland to his laboratory in Washington, D.C., using a lensed disk scanner with a 48-line resolution.He was granted U.S. Patent No. 1,544,156 on 30 June 1925.

Herbert E. Ives and Frank Gray of Bell Telephone Laboratories gave a dramatic demonstration of mechanical television on 7 April 1927. Their reflected-light television system included both small and large viewing screens. The small receiver had a 2-inch-wide by 2.5-inch-high screen. The large receiver had a screen 24 inches wide by 30 inches high. Both sets were capable of reproducing reasonably accurate, monochromatic, moving images. Along with the pictures, the sets received synchronized sound. The system transmitted images over two paths: first, a copper wire link from Washington to New York City, then a radio link from Whippany, New Jersey. Comparing the two transmission methods, viewers noted no difference in quality. Subjects of the telecast included Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover. A flying-spot scanner beam illuminated these subjects. The scanner that produced the beam had a 50-aperture disk. The disc revolved at a rate of 18 frames per second, capturing one frame about every 56 milliseconds.Television historian Albert Abramson underscored the significance of the Bell Labs demonstration: “It was in fact the best demonstration of a mechanical television system ever made to this time. It would be several years before any other system could even begin to compare with it in picture quality.”

In 1928, WRGB, then W2XB, was started as the world’s first television station. It broadcast from the General Electric facility in Schenectady, NY. It was popularly known as “WGY Television”. Meanwhile, in the Soviet Union, Léon Theremin had been developing a mirror drum-based television, starting with 16 lines resolution in 1925, then 32 lines and eventually 64 using interlacing in 1926. As part of his thesis, on 7 May 1926, he electrically transmitted, and then projected, near-simultaneous moving images on a five-foot square screen.By 1927 he achieved an image of 100 lines, a resolution that was not surpassed until May 1932 by RCA, with 120 lines.On 25 December 1926, Kenjiro Takayanagi demonstrated a television system with a 40-line resolution that employed a Nipkow disk scanner and CRT display at Hamamatsu Industrial High School in Japan. This prototype is still on display at the Takayanagi Memorial Museum in Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu Campus. His research in creating a production model was halted by the United States after Japan lost World War II.

Because only a limited number of holes could be made in the disks, and disks beyond a certain diameter became impractical, image resolution on mechanical television broadcasts was relatively low, ranging from about 30 lines up to 120 or so. Nevertheless, the image quality of 30-line transmissions steadily improved with technical advances, and by 1933 the UK broadcasts using the Baird system were remarkably clear.A few systems ranging into the 200-line region also went on the air. Two of these were the 180-line system that Compagnie des Compteurs installed in Paris in 1935, and the 180-line system that Peck Television Corp. started in 1935 at station VE9AK in Montreal.The advancement of all-electronic television marked the beginning of the end for mechanical systems as the dominant form of television. Mechanical television, despite its inferior image quality and generally smaller picture, would remain the primary television technology until the 1930s. The last mechanical television broadcasts ended in 1939 at stations run by a handful of public universities in the United States.

In 1897, English physicist J. J. Thomson was able, in his three famous experiments, to deflect cathode rays, a fundamental function of the modern cathode ray tube. The earliest version of the CRT was invented by the German physicist Ferdinand Braun in 1897 and is also known as the “Braun” tube.It was a cold-cathode diode, a modification of the Crookes tube, with a phosphor-coated screen. In 1906 the Germans Max Dieckmann and Gustav Glage produced raster images for the first time in a CRT.[31] In 1907, Russian scientist Boris Rosing used a CRT in the receiving end of an experimental video signal to form a picture. He managed to display simple geometric shapes onto the screen.

In 1908 Alan Archibald Campbell-Swinton, fellow of the Royal Society (UK), published a letter in the scientific journal Nature in which he described how “distant electric vision” could be achieved by using a cathode ray tube, or Braun tube, as both a transmitting and receiving device,He expanded on his vision in a speech given in London in 1911 and reported in The Timesand the Journal of the Röntgen Society.In a letter to Nature published in October 1926, Campbell-Swinton also announced the results of some “not very successful experiments” he had conducted with G. M. Minchin and J. C. M. Stanton. They had attempted to generate an electrical signal by projecting an image onto a selenium-coated metal plate that was simultaneously scanned by a cathode ray beam.These experiments were conducted before March 1914, when Minchin died,but they were later repeated by two different teams in 1937, by H. Miller and J. W. Strange from EMI,and by H. Iams and A. Rose from RCA.Both teams succeeded in transmitting “very faint” images with the original Campbell-Swinton’s selenium-coated plate. Although others had experimented with using a cathode ray tube as a receiver, the concept of using one as a transmitter was novel.The first cathode ray tube to use a hot cathode was developed by John B. Johnson and Harry Weiner Weinhart of Western Electric, and became a commercial product in 1922.

In 1926, Hungarian engineer Kálmán Tihanyi designed a television system utilizing fully electronic scanning and display elements and employing the principle of “charge storage” within the scanning tube. The problem of low sensitivity to light resulting in low electrical output from transmitting or “camera” tubes would be solved with the introduction of charge-storage technology by Kálmán Tihanyi beginning in 1924.His solution was a camera tube that accumulated and stored electrical charges within the tube throughout each scanning cycle. The device was first described in a patent application he filed in Hungary in March 1926 for a television system he dubbed “Radioskop”.After further refinements included in a 1928 patent application,Tihanyi’s patent was declared void in Great Britain in 1930,so he applied for patents in the United States. Although his breakthrough would be incorporated into the design of RCA’s “iconoscope” in 1931, the U.S. patent for Tihanyi’s transmitting tube would not be granted until May 1939. The patent for his receiving tube had been granted the previous October. Both patents had been purchased by RCA prior to their approval.Charge storage remains a basic principle in the design of imaging devices for television to the present day.On 25 December 1926, at Hamamatsu Industrial High School in Japan, Japanese inventor Kenjiro Takayanagi demonstrated a TV system with a 40-line resolution that employed a CRT display.This was the first working example of a fully electronic television receiver. Takayanagi did not apply for a patent.

On 7 September 1927, American inventor Philo Farnsworth’s image dissector camera tube transmitted its first image, a simple straight line, at his laboratory at 202 Green Street in San Francisco.By 3 September 1928, Farnsworth had developed the system sufficiently to hold a demonstration for the press. This is widely regarded as the first electronic television demonstration.In 1929, the system was improved further by the elimination of a motor generator, so that his television system now had no mechanical parts.That year, Farnsworth transmitted the first live human images with his system, including a three and a half-inch image of his wife Elma with her eyes closed.

 

Choose the Perfect Room

The first step is finalizing the location of the home theater in the house. Don’t worry, even a 10×10 room will be perfect for this project. You will not require taking help from any professional interior designer on this one because all you need to consider is that the room is spacious enough to house all the necessary components. Another aspect to keep in mind is the number of windows in the room. The more the windows, the higher the chances of reflection of light on the TV screen. Alternatively, if you are planning to turn your basement into a home theater, make sure you get all the water lines and electric wires fixed beforehand to avoid leaks and short circuits.

Carpet the Floor

The planned room has vinyl or wood flooring? Carpet the floor to prevent conflict between the sound that comes out from the TV speaker and the floor. Doing this, the sound produced will be clear and pleasant. Carpeting will prevent sound distortion, allowing you to have a great movie watching experience. Also, choose a dark colored carpet to dim the room well and to have a clearer view of the screen when the lights go off.

Paint the Room

If the chosen room has bright walls, get them repainted with a darker shade to make it even with the carpet floor. However, avoid using too dark shades like black, brown and dark grey. They can make the room appear depressing and the people sitting in may feel sleepy and low even when the lights are turned on. Dark shades of purple, red and maroon are the best wall color options for your home theater.

 

Decide the Position of the 4K TV

Another imperative aspect to consider is the placement of the television. If you own a 65 inch 4k TV from any of the luxury brands such as Vu TV, keep the size in mind and get it installed on a wall that is free from windows and shelves. Any distractions on the wall can ruin the movie watching experience for one and all. Also, if you want, get an electric track of motorized curtains installed to keep the TV hidden when no one is using the room. With a click of a button, the curtains would disperse to reveal the TV. Sounds fascinating, right?

In addition, you and your movie buff friends are in for a treat, if you have a 65 inch 4k Vu Premium Smart LED TV that comes loaded with amazing features such as Games Centre, AccuWeather, Opera Web Browser, YouTube access, picture perfect display quality and Netflix ready features. With so many amazing features, the experience of your home theater will just double in no time. Talking about Netflix, the remote of Vu smart TV comes with a Netflix and a YouTube button that makes turning on the apps quick and easy for you to binge watch without any hassle. In addition, you can even connect your smartphone or tablet to the TV for an unparalleled TV watching experience.

 

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